NPMA ‘Bug Barometer’ predicts a pest-filled spring

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March 31, 2020

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March 31, 2020


IMAGE: NATIONAL PEST MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION

Click on the image to see it in full size. IMAGE: NATIONAL PEST MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION

The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) has issued its spring/summer 2020 “Bug Barometer” report. The semi-annual report projects the pest pressure Americans can expect to see in their respective regions. The most recent Bug Barometer, issued yesterday, predicts that ongoing warm, wet weather has allowed pest populations to spike early and will enable them to thrive throughout spring and summer across most of the nation. According to a press release, the Bug Barometer’s region-specific analysis includes:

Northeast & New England: A warm, dry spring followed by a warm and wet summer will contribute to an increase in tick activity. Damp conditions throughout the summer will also provide ideal conditions for ants, specifically carpenter ants, and termites to thrive.

Southeast: A mild and rainy spring will create conducive conditions that allow mosquito and termite populations to thrive. Summer conditions in southern Florida may also cause a spike in cockroach and ant pressure.

Great Lakes, Ohio Valley and Midwest: Warm and wet conditions throughout spring and summer across the entire region will contribute to an increase in tick pressure, and may result in greater ant populations.

North Central U.S.: Warm, dry summer conditions in the southern part of this region will help ant populations thrive, and could mean more exposure to stinging insects. While cool conditions in the northern part of this region may delay in tick activity, increased precipitation will create ideal conditions for mosquito populations to grow.

South Central U.S.: A warm spring, followed by a warm and wet summer across the entire region, is expected to result in an increase in pest pressure — specifically for termites, ticks and cockroaches.

Southwest U.S.: Cooler, wetter conditions throughout spring and summer are expected to drive ants indoors. Expect an increase in cockroach and stinging insect populations throughout the region.

Northwest U.S.: Humid conditions throughout spring and summer in the eastern part of this region will allow stinging insect and tick populations to flourish. Warm and wet conditions in the western part of this region may also contribute to increased mosquito populations.

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About the Author

Heather Gooch

Heather Gooch is the editor-in-chief for PMP magazine. She can be reached at hgooch@northcoastmedia.net or 330-321-9754.

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