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Beware: Termiticide treatment zone disruptions

|  September 26, 2019
Dr. Nicky Gallagher, Technical Services Manager, Syngenta Professional Pest Management

Dr. Nicky Gallagher, Technical Services Manager, Syngenta Professional Pest Management

Flooding and other effects from significant storms can disrupt termiticide treatment zones. If the termiticide layer is disturbed, the treatment zone may not be effective and the termiticide may need to be reapplied.

The key factor that determines whether a retreatment is needed is soil movement. PMPs should use repair and reconstruction efforts as opportunities to evaluate the potential for termite damage, and take the necessary precautions. Additionally, structures should be closely inspected over the next few years, regardless of the damage extent, so they can be adequately protected from future termite damage.
 

Another soil movement situation: Mulch

Mulch that is 4 inches or more is too thick, and creates conditions conducive to termites. It offers a bridge into a structure that allows termites to bypass a soil termiticide treatment, and also obscures the foundation during inspections.

An inspection gap between mulch and siding should be 6 inches or wider, so inspectors can determine whether mud tubes have been built. Ideally, a 6- to 12-inch mulch-free zone should exist around the foundation. A dual rake/hoe hand tool can help pull away thick layers of mulch during the inspection process.

Read more of Dr. Gallagher’s termite tips:

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